High RisK & Emergency Surgeries


1. Emergency / Trauma surgery

Trauma surgery is a surgical specialty that utilizes both operative and non-operative management to treat traumatic injuries, typically in an acute setting. Trauma surgeons generally complete residency training in General Surgery and often fellowship training in trauma or surgical critical care.


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2. Gastrointestinal Perforation

Gastrointestinal perforation (GP) occurs when a hole forms all the way through the stomach, large bowel, or small intestine. It can be due to a number of different diseases, including appendicitis and diverticulitis. It can also be the result of trauma, such as a knife wound or gunshot wound.


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3. Intestinal Obstruction

An intestinal obstruction occurs when your small or large intestine is blocked. The blockage can be partial or total, and it prevents passage of fluids and digested food. If intestinal obstruction happens, food, fluids, gastric acids, and gas build up behind the site of the blockage.


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4. Obstructed/Strangulated Hernia

A strangulated hernia is a life-threatening medical condition. Fatty tissue or a section of the small intestines pushes through a weakened area of the abdominal muscle. The surrounding muscle then clamps down around the tissue, cutting off the blood supply to the small intestine.


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5. Pancreatic Surgery

A pancreaticoduodenectomy, also known as a Whipple procedure, is a major surgical operation most often performed to remove cancerous tumours off the head of the pancreas. It is also used for the treatment of pancreatic or duodenal trauma, or chronic pancreatitis.


6. Surgery for abdominal injuries

Abdominal surgery following traumatic injury is performed primarily for two reasons: (1) bleeding, in which there is injury to one or more blood vessels or a solid organ (i.e. spleen, liver, kidney), or (2) contamination, in which there is a hollow viscus injury with intra-abdominal spillage of luminal contents (i.e. stomach, small bowel, colon, gallbladder).